Why Big Medicine Doesn’t Always Work for Those Outside the Mainstream Circle

Compounding medicine has been the solution for small-time and niche veterinarian care specialists for years. They have asked for it. Some have gotten it. The compounding systems work because they can accommodate small and single-dose orders with ease.

Compounding medicine is more of a process than it is a technique. For veterinarian care specialists, access can often determine how well they are able to do their job. Due to different demands, some justified and some not, access to pertinent medicine can be limited. These limits can impose frustrations restrictions to how a veterinarian care specialist is able to cater to their cuddly clients.

Too Big to Move

The issue is one of the big entities controlling the flow of medications. Needless excursions into limitations and restrictions can bottle the system. There is also a matter of weight. Some providers are so large in scale, that they can work globally with rapid efficiency. But, their strengths lie en masse. In other words, these organizations can supply 10,000 units to a series of hospitals in Africa or Italy, but they can’t effectively send a single box to Australia.

All About the Money

The problem is partly financial. What is the incentive for a major supplier to send a small batch order, let alone a single item, across the globe to a niche Australian veterinarian care specialist? Even if the finances were there to justify it, the companies are so large that doing so would come at some kind of cost. Their practices aren’t easily scaled to accommodate one million unit orders next to one unit orders, and that can be disastrous for the small specialist team.

Some professionals are seeking to remedy this absurd disconnect between access at a small scale and resources at a high scale. “Nicholas Bova” and his team, including Ben Sykes, have helped formulate a system of access. Their efforts at Bova Compounding have reinvigorated the alternative medicine networks. Now, small care specialists can receive the treatments they need no matter how peculiar the situation may be. Small medicine circles are often at odds with big suppliers. This does not need to be a concern that lasts for much longer.


Comments are closed.